Qblock: The First Turnkey Surveillance Solution Powered by PowerEdge & Isilon

Ken Mills

Chief Technology Officer: Surveillance and Security at Dell EMC
As CTO, Ken has been instrumental in building the Dell EMC Surveillance and Reconnaissance business and leading global marketing and strategy for Dell EMC Surveillance solutions. Previously, he built a thriving Surveillance/Access Control/Emergency Response business for Cisco as a founding member of their Emerging Technologies organization. Ken developed the concept of “Public Safety Data Lake,” where agencies can leverage enterprise data management solutions to address the growing demand for storage and security, and has published numerous articles on public safety technology trends. Ken is a founding member of the Security Industry Association’s Cyber Security Advisory Board, and on the Board of Directors.

The surveillance industry has been moving to the datacenter as more and more customers are looking to IT grade solutions to transport, process and store their surveillance data. Surveillance data is experiencing a massive increase in camera quantities, resolutions, and retention times. Surveillance data is now a mission critical application and it is no longer okay to deploy the lowest cost alternative. The challenge for our customers, is how do you take advantage of IT grade solutions for surveillance without making it overly complicated to support?  It is critical that they procure validated solutions that are turnkey that address the underlying system requirements.

Imagine buying a car where you had to purchase the engine from one manufacturer, the transmission from another and the electrical system from a third. Once you have all of the parts, it’s your responsibility to put them together and make the car run.

Qognify knows there is a better way and has partnered with Dell EMC to create QBlock, the first turnkey NAS video management solution.

SIMPLE

QBlock provides the necessary Software, Compute and Storage components in one unified surveillance solution.

Software—QBlock VisionHub is a high end IP video management system is a completely open, Physical Security Information Management (PSIM) enabled, standard solution.

Compute—Dell’s PowerEdge servers are designed to handle evolving and complex workloads through innovations in server-based storage, such as flash, and software-defined storage (SDS).

Storage—The Isilon scale-out network-attached storage (NAS) platform combines modular hardware with unified software to harness unstructured data.

SUPPORTED

Maintaining any IT infrastructure is a challenge, especially when issues arise. Identifying which hardware or software components are involved in the issue is often the easy part of a resolution. If those components come from different vendors, you are bound to spend time

Having a single support team that has validated the entire Surveillance solution removes the complexity of moving from one vendor to the other in an effort to narrow down where the specific issue resides and finally begin fixing the problem.

The end result is faster diagnostics with proven resolutions, which means less down time.

SCALABLE

By having a validated surveillance solution, Dell EMC is able to meet a broad scope of storage and compute requirements and ultimately deliver an infrastructure strategy that meets your immediate needs, while maintaining the flexibility to scale up to accommodate future requirements.

For more information on Qblock, please visit http://www.qognify.com/qblock/

You can also see the Qblock in person at ISCWest April 5-7th. Booth 9109

EMC Video Transport solving the challange of video transport

solving the challange of video transport

Frank McCarthy

Latest posts by Frank McCarthy (see all)

One of the greatest challenges that organizations face with their surveillance data is the ability to aggregate structured and unstructured data sets relevant to real-time situational awareness and post event investigations. The transfer and aggregation of this data is becoming more challenging every day as agencies continue to add security assets and sensors that increase the total amount of surveillance exponentially. A critical aspect to consider is how can organizations gain access to this important data routinely and securely? Even with unlimited network bandwidth organizations still have to contend with the efficient utilization of their networks as well as ensure that the data they are generating with their surveillance systems is accessible where and when they need it.

To facilitate the aggregation of data for analysis EMC is introducing EMC Video Transport (EVT). EVT is an Agent and manager host based application that can seamlessly manage the data transfer from thousands of remote, distributed sites in an automated or ad hoc fashion. EVT Agents from remote sites communicate with Agents at the central site while the Manager application coordinates and controls the entire process. All transfer activities are logged in detail for chain of custody reporting as well as provide real-time notification and updates of transfers in progress. Using patented network bandwidth management algorithms EVT provides accelerated file transfer as much as 30-100% faster than traditional OS based copy services. EVT employs check point restarts so interrupted transfers restart from where they left off. Transfer persistence and assurance built into EVT also guarantees file transfers will be completed if scheduled target Agents are offline or unexpected network outages impacts file transfer jobs. The level of assurance and persistence for file transfers provided by EVT is far beyond that of traditional OS based copy commands typically used in home grown scripts and cron jobs. EVT also has a cloud ennoblement plug-in for S3 compatible cloud providers.

EVT1

EMC’s Surveillance Validation lab has performed extensive testing with EVT and most major Video Management Software providers. Please refer to the Validation matrix on EMC.com at

www.emc.com/collateral/solution-overview/h15160-emc-video-transport-delivering-solutions.pdf

The Source Podcast hosted by Sam Marraccini with Frank McCarthy and Ken Mills

Episode #39: Video Surveillance and EMC Video Transport (EVT)

Rise of the Edge Storage in Distributed Video Surveillance Part II: Metro Rails

Part II: Metro Rails

Manu Shankar

APJ Sales Director - Security Surveillance at EMC , APJ HQ @Singapore
Manu has 22 years of Enterprise IT Industry experience which includes Technolgy & Solution Sales, Business Development, People Management, Product Management and Alliances. Focussed & Experienced in starting up and building Country Business, New Lines of Business, Large Customer Acquisitions, New Partner Eco System in the area of Enterprise IT, Security Surveillance, Sm, Internet of things and Big Data Solutions

metroPassenger rail networks are by definition open systems, accessible through many entry and exit points, with the volume of users often reaching hundreds of thousands, even millions, each day. Security measures therefore need to ensure these unique operational considerations without compromising the functionality of this vital infrastructure.

The attacks on trains in Madrid in 2004, London in 2005, Mumbai in 2008 and recently in Brussels highlighted the vulnerability of rail transport to acts of terrorism. Rail operators and Government agencies all over the world have been forced to adapt quickly and respond to the massive challenge of securing open transit networks.

Ten years ago networks operated with 5-10mbps transmission based on a handful of cameras. Today you have installations with hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of IP based cameras that require hundreds of gigabytes or terabytes of capacity. One of the vulnerabilities in proprietary systems even though might be cheap to install is that they could be rendered useless when the technology moves on. Hence you are more likely to succeed with a purpose-built system from a larger company, which will be less vulnerable to fluctuating business conditions.

All the above reasons are driving the Metro Rail Customers to look out for an Open Standard Video Surveillance Platform and we at EMC had envisaged this couple of years back which led us to launch the VSS1600 our second generation purpose built Enterprise Storage System for Video Surveillance Workloads this month (our first gen was VSS-100).

vsss1600

Some of the benefits of this VSS1600 Video Surveillance Storage Platform in Metro Stations are

Crime investigation – Video surveillance footage can prove extremely useful in investigating incidents where a crime or terrorist act is carried out. By analyzing recorded footage, security officials can identify suspects and examine what steps need to be taken to prevent future acts from occurring. Hence one needs to have an Enterprise Class Storage System to ensure the data is protected and available all the time.

Tiered Digital Storage – The current & most important data can be stored in the VSS1600, cold archive data like Tagged Video’s, Incidents, Alarms can be seamlessly tiered to a software defined Cloud Storage platform for commodity infrastructure.

Difficult Task of Securing Millions of Residents Guest Blog: Verint

Guest Blog: Verint

Eran Wachman

VP. Product Business Development at Verint

Latest posts by Eran Wachman (see all)

EMC worldIn cities around the globe, police officers and public safety officials work to ensure the safety of millions of residents—a prospect that must often feel daunting.

With so many people witnessing and experiencing almost daily incidents in their city, a growing number of officials realize the potential benefits of including citizens in public safety initiatives. One of the best ways to do this is through “crowdsourcing,” which involves engaging and enabling private citizens to help public safety professionals address daily hazards and suspicious activities, natural disasters, terror attacks, crime or vandalism by reporting information in a convenient and accessible way using their smartphones. In many programs, citizens can submit such reports anonymously using a laptop or desktop computer.

Several factors have aligned to make now the ideal time to harness the potential of crowdsourcing. More citizens use smartphones and social media than ever before. They go about their daily lives and collect valuable information and video on both routine occurrences—such as traffic-accident-causing delays—and on extraordinary events, such as the Boston Marathon bombing.

Meanwhile, more cities are employing situational management technologies and tired storage including cloud to host the increased demand for storage from high definition security cameras and citizens smart phones. Today’s command-and-control platforms allow officials to gather data from social media sites, anonymous tips and even special public safety apps that enable real-time event reporting and live video streaming directly to first responders.

By leveraging these “eyes on the street,” cities help to create more engaged citizens

Correlating these citizen reports with incoming data from other systems, such as video surveillance, traffic monitoring, gunshot detection sensors, weather reports, etc., allows officials to gain a better understanding of what is happening at any moment, as well as trends that may emerge over time.

By leveraging these “eyes on the street,” cities help to create more engaged citizens, while also gaining intelligence from the public on incidents not limited to 911 emergencies. This helps to improve situational awareness and incident response across a range of incidents. Around the world, crowdsourcing initiatives are being implemented in the form of “see something, report something” campaigns, Amber Alert tips, post-incident evidence gathering and more.

Crowdsourcing is also useful for personal protection and real-time response. For example, several people can simultaneously report that a riot is developing and getting out of control—so then police can respond faster and more effectively.

“To learn more about how Verint is helping clients engage citizens for greater Situational Awareness stop by our booth (#874) in the main exhibit hall.”

Body Cameras Bring Cost of Cloud Into Focus

Ken Mills

Chief Technology Officer: Surveillance and Security at Dell EMC
As CTO, Ken has been instrumental in building the Dell EMC Surveillance and Reconnaissance business and leading global marketing and strategy for Dell EMC Surveillance solutions. Previously, he built a thriving Surveillance/Access Control/Emergency Response business for Cisco as a founding member of their Emerging Technologies organization. Ken developed the concept of “Public Safety Data Lake,” where agencies can leverage enterprise data management solutions to address the growing demand for storage and security, and has published numerous articles on public safety technology trends. Ken is a founding member of the Security Industry Association’s Cyber Security Advisory Board, and on the Board of Directors.

cam3Body cameras have been in the news this week with big stories in the Los Angeles Times and Wall Street Journal, and the cost of storage has been a big a part of the story. I have met with many different customers around evidence storage and the long term costs associated and I often hear that they are “going cloud” because they believe it is less expensive than on-premises storage. Cloud is without a doubt changing the landscape for our apps at home, on our phones, and in the enterprise. There are a lot of situations where cloud is the right choice. Cloud for evidence is more nuanced than lets say, deploying Office 365. Evidence data grows every year and sits unused for most of its lifetime. Evidence video has a shelf life of 3, 5 , or even 20 years or more in some cases.  When storing that much data and for that long of a time, you have to think beyond the first 5 years. One of the most common offers I encounter when talking to customers is the “unlimited” per camera plan for body camera storage. This plan sounds like a great deal up front, but when you dig deeper, you quickly find that it is a much more expensive alternative to storing evidence in your datacenter.

Lets look at one example of a small city in California. The City of Alameda purchased software and cloud storage for 80 body cameras for $425,000 for 5 years. Each year Alameda will be on the hook to pay $63,000 forever to maintain their body camera video in the cloud.

80 Cameras for $63,000/year FOREVER

That is a lot of money for 80 cameras. Imagine if they had 1,000 cameras or even 10,000 cameras. This is the fundamental issue with the currently available cloud offers for body cameras. You are not getting any of the advantages of cloud and you are left with a bill that is too costly for most police departments.  Not to mention you are vendor locked-in and the cost to change vendors can be astronomical.

Contrast this with a Public Safety Data Lake designed to store, manage and secure ALL your evidence data in an open platform that you own. A Public Safety Data Lake allows you to buy the storage you need when you need it. No long term overpriced contracts. It is open to any evidence you want to store and you are not stuck managing multiple storage platforms for your evidence data.

Join us at EMC World 2016 on Tuesday May 3 @ 1:30 PM to learn more about how to turn your Evidence and Surveillance data into a Data Lake.

3 Hot Trends in Public Safety This Summer

Ken Mills

Chief Technology Officer: Surveillance and Security at Dell EMC
As CTO, Ken has been instrumental in building the Dell EMC Surveillance and Reconnaissance business and leading global marketing and strategy for Dell EMC Surveillance solutions. Previously, he built a thriving Surveillance/Access Control/Emergency Response business for Cisco as a founding member of their Emerging Technologies organization. Ken developed the concept of “Public Safety Data Lake,” where agencies can leverage enterprise data management solutions to address the growing demand for storage and security, and has published numerous articles on public safety technology trends. Ken is a founding member of the Security Industry Association’s Cyber Security Advisory Board, and on the Board of Directors.

blogpic

Summer is almost here and the heat will soon be here with it. If you are like me, you can’t wait for it to get hot. The summer brings the lake, time with the kids and sunny beaches. Before you shutdown your computer and head outside let’s take some time to look ahead and see what trends are HOT this summer in Public Safety.

  1. Body camera storage costs can be too HOT to handle

…cost of 300 body cameras to equal $18,000/day

You can not turn on the news or read a paper without seeing a story about another police department deploying a body camera pilot. Even though many police departments are in the middle of pilots, the vast majority of cities have not fully deployed body cameras. As more and more departments deploy cameras we are seeing a lot of new concerns over the long term cost of body cameras. West Milford is just one example where the city determined that the cost of body cameras were just too high. One department determined that the cost of 300 body cameras to equal $18,000/day. This cost is forever in the cloud only model! Departments have to consider alternatives to the cloud only storage approach for body cameras. Cloud is not the only option for body cameras. Many departments are deploying storage on premises for almost ½ the cost of the cloud.

  1. Police Departments want a better way to store ALL their evidence video

In almost every meeting I sit in with customers, I hear that departments want a solution for ALL their evidence video and not just their body camera footage. Today’ police departments have to store video from many different end-points. It is very costly and complicated to manage multiple evidence storage platforms. Some departments are managing 9 or more different storage platforms for their evidence. This disconnected approach adds costs, complications and does not allow agencies to fully unlock the value of all their evidence data. Disparate systems cause frustration with the users of the evidence video. It is hard to find, hard to secure, hard to track, and even harder to manage the evidence lifecycle.

  1. Enterprise Evidence Management is KEY

It is one thing to capture the evidence. It is a whole other thing to manage the evidence and the evidence lifecycle. So many departments are focused on getting the right cameras and often forget that the infrastructure to support the new cameras will far outpace the cost of the initial camera purchase. Evidence has is not all equal. Some evidence can be deleted in 30 days, other evidence has to be kept for 1 year, 5 years, 10 years or even forever in some cases. How does a department keep all this straight? What do you do when a case is appealed or dismissed? How do you ensure your evidence is where it is supposed to be and not there when it is supposed to be deleted? These are the really hard questions that require an enterprise approach to evidence. Evidence has to be available, secure, and managed properly or there is a high chance that critical evidence could be lost when needed most.

I will dive deeper into each of these trends over the next couple weeks. Please let me know what you think and if I should add any trends to the discussion.

External references:

http://www.northjersey.com/community-news/town-government/addition-of-body-cameras-deemed-as-too-expensive-1.1528631

http://m.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/mar/24/officials-say-police-body-cameras-could-cost-18k-a/

Rise of Edge Storage in Distributed Video Surveillance

Manu Shankar

APJ Sales Director - Security Surveillance at EMC , APJ HQ @Singapore
Manu has 22 years of Enterprise IT Industry experience which includes Technolgy & Solution Sales, Business Development, People Management, Product Management and Alliances. Focussed & Experienced in starting up and building Country Business, New Lines of Business, Large Customer Acquisitions, New Partner Eco System in the area of Enterprise IT, Security Surveillance, Sm, Internet of things and Big Data Solutions

Demand for HD CCTV cameras and recorders has grown rapidly in recent years. In fact, IHS forecasts that in the professional market, shipments of HD CCTV cameras will grow from fewer than 0.2 million units in 2012 to over 28 million units in 2016.

StorageReview-EMC-Surveillance-VNX-VSSStorage configured for video surveillance is gaining more industry attention. The RAW capacity shipped of SAN, NAS and DAS storage used for video surveillance is increasing at around 40% each year. The traditional boxed appliance model, (born out of the death of the VCR) typically included DVRs in a capacity to suit and perhaps external DAS for extra capacity; this was simple and it worked. Yet video surveillance has evolved and this type of approach has been insufficient for an increasing percentage of users.

Average camera resolution continues to increase. HD-compliant 1080p 25/30 fps cameras have established themselves as the minimum expected from new cameras. Panoramic and 4K cameras are two further storage-hungry high-growth categories. In addition to the above in some countries for certain segments like Energy & Utilities the recent laws is asking video data to be stored for a minimum of 90 days.

All the above reasons are driving Customers to look out for an Open Standard Video Surveillance Platform and we at EMC had envisaged this couple of years back which led us to launch the VSS1600 our second generation purpose built Enterprise Storage System for Video Surveillance Workloads this month (our first gen was VSS-100).

Our deep understanding of this industry is due to the fact that we have invested heavily on Surveillance Labs running at Durham for over 10 years and most recently in Bangalore, which helps us keep a eagle eye on this fast growing industry. Below are some of our learning from the labs

  • Surveillance Workloads are “Write” heavy and hence the need for the Storage System to be Optimized for Write heavy workloads. The reason this is important because most of the Global Top OEMs Storage systems have been optimized for IT Business applications like RDBMS, ERP and would act wobbly on a Video Surveillance workload unless properly validated.
  • Every VMS Applications is different and hence the impact on the storage systems varies from VMS Application Vendor A to B to C. Some of the VMS Applications are Optimized for Block Storage, while some of them are optimized for File Storage (NAS) and some of them like the Body Camera Applications are optimized for Object based cloud Storage System.
  • Some of the VMS Applications work on Server Virtualization and some prefer not to.
  • Some IP Camera’s stream to the Storage System directly without the need for a recording Server.

Since a year our VSS Storage Systems have gone live at Large Airports, IT/ITES Campus, Auto Manufacturing Units, Police Stations, Data Centers and the count is Rising……

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